Birds of a Feather

As you walk, bike, or jog on the paved paths lining the outskirts of the Chadakoin River, your ears become quaintly attuned to beautiful songs from a wide array of bird species. Cedar Waxwings fill the air with their high, thin, whistles in pursuit of flying insects putting on a display of dazzling aeronautics. The Belted Kingfisher’s piercing rattle is often heard as it patrols up and down the Chadakoin River.

A Cedar Waxwing takes a break from catching flying insects

A Cedar Waxwing takes a break from catching flying insects

From Cliff Swallows nesting on the side of the bridge and sub-tropical Yellow Warblers flitting about tree canopies, to the Green Heron’s balance beam act on the breakwall looking for its next meal, there is a surprise around every bend.

A Green Heron perched on the breakwall looking for lunch

A Green Heron walks on the breakwall looking for lunch

A Green Heron catches a fish at McCrea Point

A Green Heron catches a fish at McCrea Point

Mallards have long been adapted to the presence of people in that they open their beaks, beginning to squawk, waddling their way to the shoreline before plunging into the water. As a result of their adaptation, I had the pleasure of watching fuzzy mallard ducklings being escorted by their mother in places such as McCrea Point and Panzarella Park.

Mallard Ducklings follow their mom down the Chadakoin River

Mallard Ducklings follow their mom down the Chadakoin River

It’s entertaining watching them venture off on their own as mom springs out of the water, chasing after them!

Mallard Ducklings enjoy the sunshine on the Chadakoin River

Mallard Ducklings enjoy the sunshine on the Chadakoin River

The bright red plumage of the male Northern Cardinal is hard to miss along with the Song Sparrows singing their hearts out amidst the morning fog.

Ospreys are also common sights soaring over the river searching for fish. Have your eyes on the skies for these fish eating raptors and the Broad-winged Hawk which hunts small animals.

An Osprey stares down as it searches for fish

An Osprey stares downward with its bright yellow eyes

The Chadakoin River is filled with many different species throughout the seasons, so don’t hesitate to grab those binoculars and go bird watching!

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